Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Ocean Sci., 18, 1339–1359, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-1339-2022
Ocean Sci., 18, 1339–1359, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-1339-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
14 Sep 2022
Research article  | Highlight paper | 14 Sep 2022

Hydrography, circulation, and response to atmospheric forcing in the vicinity of the central Getz Ice Shelf, Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

Vår Dundas et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on os-2022-13', Anonymous Referee #1, 04 Apr 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Vår Dundas, 22 Apr 2022
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC1', Vår Dundas, 16 Jun 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on os-2022-13', Anonymous Referee #2, 04 May 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Vår Dundas, 16 Jun 2022
  • EC1: 'Comment on os-2022-13', Karen J. Heywood, 20 May 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Vår Dundas on behalf of the Authors (16 Jun 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 Jun 2022) by Karen J. Heywood
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Jul 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Jul 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (15 Jul 2022) by Karen J. Heywood
AR by Vår Dundas on behalf of the Authors (26 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 Jul 2022) by Karen J. Heywood
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Executive editor
The Antarctic is by far the largest body of water (mostly ice in this case) that is not in the sea and therefore potentially important for changing sea level. The large size of the Getz ice shelf and its as yet uncertain potential for melting by oceanic waters below make this an important study for understanding and predicting impacts of a warmer climate.
Short summary
Ice shelves in the Amundsen Sea are thinning rapidly as ocean currents bring warm water into cavities beneath the floating ice. We use 2-year-long mooring records and 16-year-long model simulations to describe the hydrography and circulation near the ice front between Siple and Carney Islands. We find that temperatures here are lower than at neighboring ice fronts and that the transport of heat toward the cavity is governed by wind stress over the Amundsen Sea continental shelf.