Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Ocean Sci., 18, 483–510, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-483-2022

Special issue: Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean (ACP/AMT/GMD/HESS/NHESS/OS...

Ocean Sci., 18, 483–510, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-483-2022
Research article
08 Apr 2022
Research article | 08 Apr 2022

Untangling the mistral and seasonal atmospheric forcing driving deep convection in the Gulf of Lion: 2012–2013

Douglas Keller Jr. et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on os-2021-72', Anonymous Referee #1, 16 Sep 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Douglas Keller Jr., 14 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on os-2021-72', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Oct 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Douglas Keller Jr., 14 Nov 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Douglas Keller Jr. on behalf of the Authors (14 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (18 Nov 2021) by Markus Meier
AR by Douglas Keller Jr. on behalf of the Authors (14 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Jan 2022) by Markus Meier
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (30 Jan 2022)
ED: Publish as is (02 Feb 2022) by Markus Meier
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Short summary
The mistral winds are believed to be the primary source of cooling of the Gulf of Lion, leading to deep convection in the region, a process that mixes the ocean column from the seafloor to the sea surface. However, we have found that seasonal atmospheric changes also significantly cool the Gulf of Lion waters to cause deep convection, rather than mistral winds being the sole source, contributing roughly two-thirds of the required cooling, with the mistral winds contributing the final third.