Articles | Volume 20, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-20-601-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-20-601-2024
Research article
 | 
19 Apr 2024
Research article |  | 19 Apr 2024

The Southern Ocean deep mixing band emerges from a competition between winter buoyancy loss and upper stratification strength

Romain Caneill, Fabien Roquet, and Jonas Nycander

Viewed

Total article views: 1,116 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
907 159 50 1,116 40 32
  • HTML: 907
  • PDF: 159
  • XML: 50
  • Total: 1,116
  • BibTeX: 40
  • EndNote: 32
Views and downloads (calculated since 19 Oct 2023)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 19 Oct 2023)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,116 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,095 with geography defined and 21 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 16 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
In winter, heat loss increases density at the surface of the Southern Ocean. This increase in density creates a mixed layer deeper than 250 m only in a narrow deep mixing band (DMB) located around 50° S. North of the DMB, the stratification is too strong to be eroded, so mixed layers are shallower. The density of cold water is almost not impacted by temperature changes. Thus, heat loss does not significantly increase the density south of the DMB, so no deep mixed layers are produced.