Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Ocean Sci., 18, 905–913, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-905-2022
Ocean Sci., 18, 905–913, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-905-2022
Technical note
13 Jun 2022
Technical note | 13 Jun 2022

Technical note: Tail behaviour of the statistical distribution of extreme storm surges

Tom Howard

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on os-2022-14', Philip Woodworth, 22 Mar 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Tom Howard, 03 Apr 2022
  • CC1: 'Comment on os-2022-14', John Hunter, 11 Apr 2022
    • AC6: 'Reply on CC1', Tom Howard, 28 Apr 2022
  • EC1: 'Comment on os-2022-14', John M. Huthnance, 20 Apr 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on EC1', Tom Howard, 20 Apr 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on os-2022-14', Anonymous Referee #2, 21 Apr 2022
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Tom Howard, 28 Apr 2022
  • AC4: 'Comment on os-2022-14', Tom Howard, 28 Apr 2022
  • AC5: 'Comment on os-2022-14', Tom Howard, 28 Apr 2022
    • AC7: 'Reply on AC5', Tom Howard, 28 Apr 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Tom Howard on behalf of the Authors (15 May 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (24 May 2022) by John M. Huthnance
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Short summary
I show that two different statistical approaches to dealing with rare sea-level extremes caused by storm surges are not incompatible, despite their apparent differences. I suggest a context in which each approach is appropriate. I undertook this research because the two approaches might seem to be incompatible, a situation which I hope that this note helps to clarify. I applied various statistical tests which have appeared in recent literature to sea-level extremes from UK coastal sites.