Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Ocean Sci., 18, 905–913, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-905-2022
Ocean Sci., 18, 905–913, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-905-2022
Technical note
13 Jun 2022
Technical note | 13 Jun 2022

Technical note: Tail behaviour of the statistical distribution of extreme storm surges

Tom Howard

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Projected sea level rise and changes in extreme storm surge and wave events during the 21st century in the region of Singapore
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Sources of 21st century regional sea-level rise along the coast of northwest Europe
T. Howard, A. K. Pardaens, J. L. Bamber, J. Ridley, G. Spada, R. T. W. L. Hurkmans, J. A. Lowe, and D. Vaughan
Ocean Sci., 10, 473–483, https://doi.org/10.5194/os-10-473-2014,https://doi.org/10.5194/os-10-473-2014, 2014
The land-ice contribution to 21st-century dynamic sea level rise
T. Howard, J. Ridley, A. K. Pardaens, R. T. W. L. Hurkmans, A. J. Payne, R. H. Giesen, J. A. Lowe, J. L. Bamber, T. L. Edwards, and J. Oerlemans
Ocean Sci., 10, 485–500, https://doi.org/10.5194/os-10-485-2014,https://doi.org/10.5194/os-10-485-2014, 2014

Cited articles

Batstone, C., Lawless, M., Tawn, J., Horsburgh, K., Blackman, D., McMillan, A., Worth, D., Laeger, S., and Hunt, T.: A UK best-practice approach for extreme sea-level analysis along complex topographic coastlines, Ocean Eng., 71, 28–39, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oceaneng.2013.02.003, 2013. a
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Coles, S.: An introduction to statistical modeling of extreme values, Springer, 1st Edn., 208 pp., ISBN 1852334592, 2001. a, b, c, d
de Vries, H., Breton, M., de Mulder, T., Krestenitis, Y., Ozer, J., Proctor, R., Ruddick, K., Salomon, J. C., and Voorrips, A.: A comparison of 2D storm surge models applied to three shallow European seas, Environ. Softw., 10, 23–42, https://doi.org/10.1016/0266-9838(95)00003-4, 1995. a
Dixon, M. J., Tawn, J. A., and Vassie, J. M.: Spatial modelling of extreme sea-levels, Environmetrics, 9, 283–301, https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-095X(199805/06)9:3<283::AID-ENV304>3.0.CO;2-#, 1998. a
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Short summary
I show that two different statistical approaches to dealing with rare sea-level extremes caused by storm surges are not incompatible, despite their apparent differences. I suggest a context in which each approach is appropriate. I undertook this research because the two approaches might seem to be incompatible, a situation which I hope that this note helps to clarify. I applied various statistical tests which have appeared in recent literature to sea-level extremes from UK coastal sites.