Articles | Volume 18, issue 1
Ocean Sci., 18, 269–293, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-269-2022
Ocean Sci., 18, 269–293, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-269-2022

Research article 03 Mar 2022

Research article | 03 Mar 2022

Using machine learning and beach cleanup data to explain litter quantities along the Dutch North Sea coast

Mikael L. A. Kaandorp et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on os-2021-83', Anonymous Referee #1, 14 Oct 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC1', Mikael Kaandorp, 22 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on os-2021-83', Anonymous Referee #2, 18 Oct 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Mikael Kaandorp, 22 Dec 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on os-2021-83', Anonymous Referee #3, 18 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC3', Mikael Kaandorp, 22 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Mikael Kaandorp on behalf of the Authors (23 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Jan 2022) by Oliver Zielinski
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 Jan 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (24 Jan 2022)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (25 Jan 2022) by Oliver Zielinski
AR by Mikael Kaandorp on behalf of the Authors (31 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
A large amount of marine litter, such as plastics, is located on or around beaches. Both the total amount of this litter and its transport are poorly understood. We investigate this by training a machine learning model with data of cleanup efforts on Dutch beaches between 2014 and 2019, obtained by about 14 000 volunteers. We find that Dutch beaches contain up to 30 000 kg of litter, largely depending on tides, oceanic transport, and how exposed the beaches are.