Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Ocean Sci., 17, 181–186, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-17-181-2021
Ocean Sci., 17, 181–186, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-17-181-2021

OS Letters 02 Feb 2021

OS Letters | 02 Feb 2021

The transient sensitivity of sea level rise

Aslak Grinsted and Jens Hesselbjerg Christensen

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Aslak Grinsted on behalf of the Authors (22 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Oct 2020) by Markus Meier
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Nov 2020)
RR by Tal Ezer (05 Nov 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (06 Nov 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (08 Nov 2020) by Markus Meier
AR by Aslak Grinsted on behalf of the Authors (18 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Nov 2020) by Markus Meier
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Nov 2020)
ED: Publish as is (28 Nov 2020) by Markus Meier
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Short summary
As we warm our planet, oceans expand, ice on land melts, and sea levels rise. On century timescales, we find that the sea level response to warming can be characterized by a single metric: the transient sea level sensitivity. Historical sea level exhibits substantially higher sensitivity than model-based estimates of future climates in authoritative climate assessments, implying recent projections could well underestimate the likely sea level rise by the end of this century.