Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-15-1341-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-15-1341-2019
Research article
 | 
14 Oct 2019
Research article |  | 14 Oct 2019

Basin-scale sources and pathways of microplastic that ends up in the Galápagos Archipelago

Erik van Sebille, Philippe Delandmeter, John Schofield, Britta Denise Hardesty, Jen Jones, and Andy Donnelly

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Short summary
The Galápagos Archipelago and Galápagos Marine Reserve are among the world's most iconic wildlife refuges. Yet, plastic litter is now found even in this remote archipelago. It is unclear where this plastic originates from. In this study, we show that remote coastal sources of plastic pollution are fairly localized and limited to South American and Central American coastlines. Identifying how plastic ends up in the Galápagos aids integrated management opportunities to reduce plastic pollution.