Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Ocean Sci., 18, 953–978, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-953-2022
Ocean Sci., 18, 953–978, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-18-953-2022
Research article
06 Jul 2022
Research article | 06 Jul 2022

Causes of the 2015 North Atlantic cold anomaly in a global state estimate

Rachael N. C. Sanders et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on os-2022-10', Dr. Nicholas Foukal, 20 Mar 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Rachael Sanders, 20 May 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on os-2022-10', Anonymous Referee #2, 22 Apr 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Rachael Sanders, 20 May 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Rachael Sanders on behalf of the Authors (20 May 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (31 May 2022) by Anne Marie Tréguier
AR by Rachael Sanders on behalf of the Authors (01 Jun 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (02 Jun 2022) by Anne Marie Tréguier
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Short summary
In 2015, record low temperatures were observed in the North Atlantic. Using an ocean model, we show that surface heat loss in December 2013 caused 75 % of the initial cooling before this "cold blob" was trapped below the surface. The following summer, the cold blob re-emerged due to a strong temperature difference between the surface ocean and below, driving vertical diffusion of heat. Lower than average surface warming then led to the coldest temperature anomalies in August 2015.