Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Ocean Sci., 17, 383–392, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-17-383-2021
Ocean Sci., 17, 383–392, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-17-383-2021

Research article 22 Feb 2021

Research article | 22 Feb 2021

Can seafloor voltage cables be used to study large-scale circulation? An investigation in the Pacific Ocean

Jakub Velímský et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Neesha Schnepf on behalf of the Authors (04 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Dec 2020) by Erik van Sebille
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (12 Jan 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (12 Jan 2021) by Erik van Sebille
AR by Neesha Schnepf on behalf of the Authors (17 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Jan 2021) by Erik van Sebille
AR by Neesha Schnepf on behalf of the Authors (18 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Marine electromagnetic (EM) signals largely depend on three factors: the direction and speed of ocean flow, the strength of Earth’s main magnetic field, and seawater’s electrical conductivity (which depends on the local temperature and salinity). Because of this, there is interest in using marine EM signals to monitor and study ocean circulation. Our study investigates using voltage data from retired seafloor telecommunication cables in the Pacific Ocean to monitor large-scale flows.