Articles | Volume 13, issue 6
Ocean Sci., 13, 961–982, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-13-961-2017

Special issue: Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) (ACP/OS inter-journal...

Ocean Sci., 13, 961–982, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-13-961-2017

Research article 23 Nov 2017

Research article | 23 Nov 2017

Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) cycling across contrasting biological hotspots of the New Zealand subtropical front

Martine Lizotte et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by M. Lizotte on behalf of the Authors (06 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (15 Sep 2017) by Mike Harvey
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (29 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 Oct 2017) by Mike Harvey
AR by M. Lizotte on behalf of the Authors (18 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
During a 4-week oceanographic cruise in 2012, we investigated the water masses bordering the subtropical front near New Zealand as sources of the biogenic gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS). DMS oxidation products may influence the atmospheric radiative budget of the Earth. Concentrations of DMS were high in the study region and DMS's precursor, dimethylsulfoniopropionate, showed a strong association with phytoplankton biomass in relation to the persistent dominance of dinoflagellates/coccolithophores.