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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-12-83-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-12-83-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  21 Jan 2015

21 Jan 2015

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This preprint was under review for the journal OS but the revision was not accepted.

Sea surface height and mixed layer depth responses to sea surface temperature in northwestern Pacific subtropical front zone from spring to summer

C. Qiu1,4, H. Kawamura2, H. Mao3, and J. Wu1 C. Qiu et al.
  • 1Center for Coastal Ocean Science and Technology, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
  • 2Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies, Graduate school of Science, Tohoku University, Japan
  • 3State key Laboratory of Tropical Oceanography, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy Science, China
  • 4Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Resources and Coastal Engineering, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

Abstract. Qiu et al. (2014) quantitatively examined the mechanisms of sea surface temperature front disappearance, finding that the formation of shallow mixed layer depth (MLD) is very important. In the present study, we further investigated variations of the sea level anomaly (SLA) and mixed layer depth (MLD) during the SST front weakening period, based on weekly satellite derived products. For the SLA, we examined the steric height component of SLA, using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) method and physical method. The seasonal variations of steric height from above two methods have the same pattern: peak value (~ 20 cm) occurs in July-August, and minimum value (~ −5 cm) occurs in February to March. Correlation between SLA and SST achieves 0.76 in cold zone and frontal zone, and it is 0.86 between steric component and SST. When SST becomes large, MLD decreases gradually. The linear relationship (y = −4.46 x +156.47) between MLD and SST could be used to estimate the MLD in the subtropical front zone.

C. Qiu et al.

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Short summary
We made match-up datasets of satellite sea surface temperature(SST), sea level anomaly(SLA),and in situ mixed layer depth(MLD). Variations of SLA and MLD across subtropical front were examined. The steric component of SLA dominant the seasonal variations of SLA. Correlation betwwen SLA and SST is 0.76. Negative correlation between MLD and SST provide a feasibility to retrieval MLD using surface parameters.
We made match-up datasets of satellite sea surface temperature(SST), sea level anomaly(SLA),and...
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