Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-11-2907-2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/osd-11-2907-2014

  12 Dec 2014

12 Dec 2014

Review status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Global representation of tropical cyclone-induced ocean thermal changes using Argo data – Part 2: Estimating air–sea heat fluxes and ocean heat content changes

L. Cheng1, J. Zhu1, and R. L. Sriver2 L. Cheng et al.
  • 1International Center for Climate and Environment Sciences, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 2Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA

Abstract. We use Argo temperature data to examine changes in ocean heat content (OHC) and air–sea heat fluxes induced by tropical cyclones (TC)s on a global scale. A footprint technique that analyzes the vertical structure of cross-track thermal responses along all storm tracks during the period 2004–2012 is utilized (see part I). We find that TCs are responsible for 1.87 PW (11.05 W m−2 when averaging over the global ocean basin) of heat transfer annually from the global ocean to the atmosphere during storm passage (0–3 days) on a global scale. Of this total, 1.05 ± 0.20 PW (4.80 ± 0.85 W m−2) is caused by Tropical storms/Tropical depressions (TS/TD) and 0.82 ± 0.21 PW (6.25 ± 1.5 W m−2) is caused by hurricanes. Our findings indicate that ocean heat loss by TCs may be a substantial missing piece of the global ocean heat budget. Net changes in OHC after storm passage is estimated by analyzing the temperature anomalies during wake recovery following storm events (4–20 days after storm passage) relative to pre-storm conditions. Results indicate the global ocean experiences a 0.75 ± 0.25 PW (5.98 ± 2.1W m−2) net heat gain annually for hurricanes. In contrast, under TS/TD conditions, ocean experiences 0.41 ± 0.21 PW (1.90 ± 0.96 W m−2) net ocean heat loss, suggesting the overall oceanic thermal response is particularly sensitive to the intensity of the event. The net ocean heat uptake caused by all storms is 0.34 PW.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

L. Cheng et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

L. Cheng et al.

L. Cheng et al.

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This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
1. TCs are responsible for 1.87 PW (11.05 W/m2) of heat transfer annually from the global ocean to the atmosphere during storm passage (0-3 days) on a global scale. Of this total, 1.05±0.20 PW (4.80±0.85 W/m2) is caused by TS/TD and 0.82±0.21 PW (6.25±1.5 W/m2) is caused by hurricanes. 2.The net ocean heat uptake caused by all storms is 0.34 PW (4-20 days mean). Hurricanes induce 0.75±0.25 PW (5.98±2.1 W/m2) net heat gain, and TS/TD leads to 0.41±0.21 PW (1.90±0.96 W/m2) net heat loss.