Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2021-96
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2021-96

  07 Oct 2021

07 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal OS.

Air-sea heat flux during warming season determines the interannual variation of bottom cold water mass in a semi-enclosed bay

Junying Zhu1, Jie Shi2,3, and Xinyu Guo4 Junying Zhu et al.
  • 1College of Marine Sciences, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Marine Environment and Ecology, Ocean University of China, Ministry of Education, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100, China
  • 3Laboratory for Marine Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266071, China
  • 4Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-Cho, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan

Abstract. A bottom cold water mass (BCWM) is a widespread physical oceanographic phenomenon in coastal seas, and its temperature variability has an important effect on the marine ecological environment. In this study, the interannual variation of the BCWM in Iyo-Nada (INCWM), a semi-enclosed bay in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, from 1994 to 2015 and its influencing factors were investigated using monthly observational data and a hydrodynamic model. The interannual variation in water temperature inside the INCWM showed a negative correlation with the area of the INCWM, and positive correlations with the local water temperature from April to July and with remote water temperature below 10 m in an adjacent strait in July. Differing from previously studied BCWMs, which had interannual variations depending closely on the water temperature before the warming season, the interannual variation of INCWM depends strongly on the air-sea heat flux during the warming season via local vertical heat transport and lateral heat advection. Further, by comparing several BCWMs, we found that the BCWM size is a key factor in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the interannual variation of BCWMs in coastal seas. These findings will help to predict bottom water temperatures and improve the current understanding of ecosystem changes in shelf seas under global climate change.

Junying Zhu et al.

Status: open (until 02 Dec 2021)

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Junying Zhu et al.

Junying Zhu et al.

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Short summary
A Bottom cold water mass (BCWM) is a widespread physical oceanographic phenomenon among coastal seas. Observations reveal a prominent interannual variation in a BCWM in the Seto Inland Sea during 1994–2015. Air-sea heat flux during warming season, not wintertime cooling, is the dominant factor in the interannual variation of the BCWM. Comparison with other BCWMs indicates that the size is a key factor for their difference. The findings help understand the response of BCWMs to climate change.