Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2021-55
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2021-55

  06 Jul 2021

06 Jul 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal OS.

Sea-level variability and change along the Norwegian coast between 2003 and 2018 from satellite altimetry, tide gauges and hydrography

Fabio Mangini1, Léon Chafik2, Antonio Bonaduce1, Laurent Bertino1, and Jan Even Øie Nilsen3 Fabio Mangini et al.
  • 1Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway
  • 2Department of Meteorology and Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 3Institute of Marine Research and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway

Abstract. Sea-level variations in coastal areas can differ significantly from those in the nearby open ocean. Monitoring coastal sea-level variations is therefore crucial to understand how climate variability can affect the densely populated coastal regions of the globe. In this paper, we study the sea-level variability along the coast of Norway by means of in situ records, satellite altimetry data, and a network of eight hydrographic stations over a period spanning 16 years (from 2003 to 2018). At first, we evaluate the performance of the ALES-reprocessed coastal altimetry dataset by comparing it with the sea-level anomaly from tide gauges over a range of timescales, which include the long-term trend, the annual cycle and the detrended and deseasoned sea level anomaly. We find that coastal altimetry outperforms conventional altimetry products at most locations along the Norwegian coast. We later take advantage of the coastal altimetry dataset to perform a sea level budget along the Norwegian coast. We find that the thermosteric and the halosteric signals give a comparable contribution to the sea-level trend along the Norwegian coast, except for three, non-adjacent hydrographic stations, where salinity variations affect the sea-level trend more than temperature variations. We also find that the sea-level annual cycle is more affected by variations in temperature than in salinity, and that both temperature and salinity give a comparable contribution to the detrended and deseasoned sea-level along the entire Norwegian coast.

Fabio Mangini et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on os-2021-55', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Fabio Mangini, 22 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on os-2021-55', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Aug 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Fabio Mangini, 22 Oct 2021

Fabio Mangini et al.

Fabio Mangini et al.

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Short summary
We validate the recent ALES coastal satellite altimetry dataset along the Norwegian coast between 2003 and 2018. Compared to previous altimetry products, the ALES dataset agrees better with tide gauges in terms of linear trend, seasonal cycle, and inter-annual variability. We then use the ALES dataset and hydrographic stations to explore the sea-level budget and refine the description of the governing processes of sea-level variability along the Norwegian coast.