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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2020-56
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2020-56
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  15 Jun 2020

15 Jun 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal OS.

Climate-scale changes of the semidiurnal tide over the North Atlantic coasts from 1846 to 2018

Lucia Pineau-Guillou1, Pascal Lazure1, and Guy Wöppelmann2 Lucia Pineau-Guillou et al.
  • 1IFREMER, CNRS, IRD, UBO, Laboratoire d’Océanographie Physique et Spatiale, UMR 6523, IUEM, Brest, France
  • 2LIENSS, Université de la Rochelle-CNRS, La Rochelle, France

Abstract. We investigated the long-term changes of the principal tidal component M2 over the North Atlantic coasts, from 1846 to 2018. We analysed 9 tide gauges with time series starting no later than 1920. The longest is Brest with 165 years of observations. We carefully processed the data, particularly to remove the 18.6-year nodal modulation. We found that M2 variations are consistent at all the stations in the North East Atlantic (Newlyn, Brest, Cuxhaven), whereas some discrepancies appear in the North West Atlantic. The changes started long before the XXth century, and are not linear. The trends vary from a station to another; they are overall positive, up to 0.7 mm/yr. Since 1990, the trends switch from positive to negative values. Concerning the possible causes of the observed changes, the similarity between the North Atlantic Oscillation and M2 variations in the North East Atlantic suggests a possible influence of the large-scale atmospheric circulation on the tide. We discuss a possible underlying mechanism. A different spatial distribution of water heights from one year to another, depending on the low-frequency sea-level pressure patterns, could impact the propagation of the tide in the North Atlantic basin. However, the hypothesis is at present unproven.

Lucia Pineau-Guillou et al.

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Lucia Pineau-Guillou et al.

Lucia Pineau-Guillou et al.

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Short summary
We investigated the long-term changes of the principal tidal component M2 over the North Atlantic coasts, from 1846 to 2018. We analysed 9 tide gauges. We found that M2 variations are consistent at all the stations in the North East Atlantic, whereas some discrepancies appear in the North West Atlantic. The similarity between the North Atlantic Oscillation and M2 variations in the North East Atlantic suggests a possible influence of the large-scale atmospheric circulation on the tide.
We investigated the long-term changes of the principal tidal component M2 over the North...
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